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How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others Online

When you’re constantly seeing the lives of others online, it’s all too easy to start comparing yourself to them. We are bombarded with everyone else’s achievements and successes, and it can make us feel bad about ourselves.  

It can be easy to compare yourself to others online.

But the reality is, all of us are in the same boat. The people you compare yourself to are doing the same thing to someone else. Social media is hard to avoid, so it’s best to focus on ways to make it a positive experience. There are lots of things you can do to limit the negativity that can come from social media, which can help you to stop comparing yourself to others. 

Read Now: The Impact of Screen Addiction on Health and Wellbeing 

Remember Reality 

It’s important to remember that what you see on social media is a curated version of reality. People don’t want to post the boring or sad parts of their life, only the good stuff. This can make it seem like everyone else is living on cloud nine, and it’s easy to be jealous of that.  

People only want to share the good parts of their lives!

When you are only seeing the good aspects of people’s lives, you can’t get a full understanding of them. You can’t accurately compare yourself to people’s lives, you can’t fully understand someone when you’re only getting half the story!  

Take a step back and think about the things you share on social media. Likely, you aren’t posting about the boring stuff, and that’s the same for everyone. People only want to show the best versions of themselves, so it’s important to remember that when you are online.   

Curate Your Feed 

It’s easy to forget that you are in complete control of what you see on social media. You can actively stop following people whose posts make you feel bad about yourself, and instead, follow things that make you happy. It’s normal to compare yourself to others when you are always seeing them. In the case of social media, out of sight can really mean out of mind! 

Once you stop seeing things that make you upset, you can have a more positive experience online. Accounts that focus on creating a positive atmosphere can help you feel better about yourself whilst cutting out feelings of jealousy. You are in control of what you see on a day-to-day basis, so pick things that make you happy!  

Read Now: Doomscrolling: Navigating Mental Health and Social Media 

Reduce Your Time Online  

The more time you spend online, the higher your chances of seeing something upsetting. A digital detox is a great way to remove yourself from negative feelings that can come from social media. It gives you a chance to unplug from the internet and focus on what brings you joy in the outside world.  

Try to limit your time online so you don’t get sucked in!

Even if you don’t think you can go a full day without social media, limiting your usage can make a big difference. Try setting aside an hour or two where you put your phone down and focus on reality. You will be surprised by how much difference it can make. Disconnecting from online even for a small while can often make those insecurities feel insignificant.  

Have a Purpose 

If you don’t have a specific reason for using social media, you can end up filling your feeds with people you are comparing yourself to. You can get sucked into everyone else’s lives and find yourself comparing every move.  

Create a reason for using social media, and focus on that instead of on others. Whether you want to get ideas for craft projects, or keep up to date with pop culture. Choose something that makes you feel good, and channel your energy into it. The more focus you put on things you enjoy, the less energy you will have for comparing yourself to others.  

Confront Your Feelings  

If you really struggle to stop comparing yourself to others online, confront your feelings to try and find the source. Think about why seeing particular people or posts makes you upset, and try to challenge those feelings.  

By acknowledging it instead of pushing it away, you can begin to understand your triggers and know what to avoid. This can help you make positive changes online and in real life, as it’s likely your insecurities carry across from your personal life to online.  

Check in on how different things online make you feel.

Read Now: Toxic Positivity and Social Media: Why It’s Okay Not To Be Okay 

To Sum Up… 

It can be hard to challenge your feelings towards social media, but it can result in a more positive experience online. Try to remember that you aren’t alone, and everyone struggles with comparing themselves to others. Take control of your social media, and don’t let it control you any longer! 

If you want to learn more about how to have a positive relationship with social media, contact our life coaches at Ceed today! 

How to Improve Your Productivity with Neuroplasticity

Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to adapt, rewire and change shape with new experiences.  

At any age, the way the brain works can totally transform. We can become more optimistic, joyful, productive and better at learning without ever returning to our ‘old ways’.  

Find more productive habits with neuroplasticity!

With the myth that we use 10% of our brains debunked, we now know that our entire brains are neural real estate, forming and strengthening different neural pathways throughout the day. 

Understanding neuroplasticity can unlock a clear pathway to more productive habits. By tapping into neuroplasticity, we can achieve:  

  • Better time-keeping 
  • Improved short-term memory 
  • An efficient work life 
  • An overall more dynamic brain.  

What is Neuroplasticity? 

Neuroplasticity is the “plastic” nature of the brain – its ability to shift and change layout.  

All our habits, thought processes and beliefs – the way we think – are physically represented by neurons and neural pathways. Different neural pathways get stronger with use or waste away, much like a muscle.  

It’s easy to imagine that if we had the technology, we could understand everything about someone just by looking at the physical map of their brain, looking up close at the neural pathways and seeing which are stronger and used more than others.  

We already understand a lot, like how to use brain examinations to detect dementia and determine the cause of a stroke. 

Using certain parts of our brains more strengthens those neural pathways. This is what behavioural therapy taps into – mental muscle memory. 

Read Now: Neuroplasticity: Better Your Brain with Positive Thinking

How Can We Use it? 

The future is bright. The more we dig into the science of neuroplasticity, the more we can see the limitless ways to harness and use our brains for the better. 

Below are just a few things we can achieve by strengthening new pathways and weakening old, unhelpful ones: 

1. Changing Our Habits 

Struggling to be productive is a difficulty most of us can understand. Getting started on new projects, staying motivated and working in a consistent, efficient way are all things that don’t always come easy, but can be developed with practice.  

An understanding of neuroplasticity is a great place to start when thinking about changing your habits. This way, you can make the change as easy as possible for your brain to take on.  

Try switching up your habits for better productivity!

For example, if you want to totally overhaul your work ethic and methods, start with a small change. Instead of putting pressure on yourself to fix the problem in one fell swoop, try breaking other habits in your life first by trying new things, or even doing something you know how to do already, differently. 

Even breaking and changing habits unrelated to the big one you have your eye on will help you to eventually make the change. This is because taking on new habits and experiences strengthens neural pathways responsible for learning, making your brain more dynamic and flexible.  

Changing a habit could be as simple as taking a different route to work or shopping for food somewhere different. And when it comes to making a bigger change, try doing something a different way before replacing it altogether. Your brain can learn to adapt

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2. Communicating Better 

Communicating well is key to being part of a productive, efficient team. With good communication, skills can be shared, tasks can be completed quickly and everyone feels inclined to work well to get goals achieved.  

Using neuroplasticity to communicate better once again comes down to identifying and changing a habit. What gets in the way of feeling like we are on the same page with someone? More often than not, it is defensiveness of our own view and not understanding the view of the person we are talking with. The angrier we feel, the less inclined to connect we feel. 

This makes active listening – the act of truly trying to understand what someone is saying – impossible. In breaking this habit, the first thing to practice is checking in on whether you are actually listening to the other person.  

The second thing to do is to return to focusing on connecting and listening. While this is easier said than done, it is possible to make this a habit through practice

Read Now: How to Practice Active Listening 

4. A More Dynamic Brain 

The happiest brains are flexible and open-minded, open to learning and taking on new information. The more our brains experience changing and developing new skills, the more flexible and agile they become – and the more able to cope with any challenge. 

A brain that has recently been learning a new language and improving at sudoku will be developing strong neural connections in the parts of the brain responsible for learning. This makes it now more equipped to learn other new skills more easily. In other words, the more we change the brain through neuroplasticity, the more able to change the brain is.  

When it comes to productivity, the ideal brain can:  

  • Learn new skills 
  • Remember important details 
  • Switch between tasks easily.  

Try learning a new skill – no matter what it is, you will see benefits in how your brain processes information and takes on new challenges. 

Trying new things can create a more adaptable brain!

Read Now: How to Tap Into Neuroplasticity in Your Daily Life 

To Sum Up… 

These are just a few ways harnessing neuroplasticity can help to improve your productivity. With an understanding of how the brain makes and stores connections, we can develop any skill or ability we like more easily and effectively.  

With intention and an awareness of neuroplasticity, you can build an open-minded and flexible brain able to take on any challenge and navigate the unexpected. 

For help with making lifestyle changes, contact one of our coaches at Ceed today! 

How to Get Better Sleep

The quality of your sleep affects every aspect of your life, from how you cope with stress to your relationships and your productivity. 

Feeling like you aren’t getting enough sleep can make you anxious, which in turn can keep you awake at night, making you feel exhausted and disconnected during the day. 

Stick to a sleep routine to get better sleep!

Insomnia can feel like a vicious, endless cycle, but there are changes you can make to your daily life and mindset to try and beat it.  

Here are some of the most effective changes you can make to your lifestyle to help you get enough sleep. 

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Make Small Changes to Your Diet 

There are obvious ways to eat healthier. Working more fruit and vegetables into your daily intake, moderating your portion sizes, and cutting down on your sugar intake can all help. 

What you may not know is that exactly when you eat is important for your sleep pattern. 

Late night snacks, sugary or not, have been shown to impact sleep. The science is simple: eating at night gives you a burst of energy that you’ll struggle to burn off before bed. 

Focus on making your regular meals throughout the day more filling. If you eat sugary treats, distribute these amongst meals so you’re not tempted to reach for a box of chocolates at 11PM to fill a hole in your stomach. 

This way, you’ll be eating better, valuing your body and how food affects your mood. But you’ll also be sleeping better, giving you the positive mindset that you need to make and sustain these changes long-term. 

Reconsider your diet to get a better night’s sleep!

Read Now: A Happy Diet: 9 Foods Proven to Lift Your Mood 

Exercise More 

Tiredness brings sleep. To be tired is to have used more energy during the day than you’ve put into your body via meals or snacks. If you’ve made the above adjustments to your diet, and kept to them long-term, you’re already prepared for better sleep in the evenings. 

If you can, one of the easiest (and cheapest) ways to get some exercise is to go for a brisk walk, ideally in the afternoon, or at the end of the working day.  

According to the NHS, even a ten-minute brisk walk every day can improve your health by improving your circulation, especially if you work sitting down during the day.  

Analysts predict that the shift to home working will be a more long-term change to work culture even after the pandemic ends. This means many people will lack the opportunity to walk to and from work. So, it’s more important than ever to make a conscious decision to go for a walk.  

While walking contributes to the recommended 150 minutes of weekly exercise for adults, getting to burn off excess energy and decompress after a long day are happy side-effects. 

But whatever exercise you do, don’t do it right before bed. You won’t be in the calm state you need to be in to fall asleep while you’re full of adrenaline. 

Keep a Sleep Routine 

We’ve all been sat in front of the television, late on a weekend, awake for no reason. Our free time is limited, and we want to know that we’re making the best use of it, even if we aren’t. 

So, rather than staying up as late as humanly possible on a Friday or Saturday, keep close to your weekday bedtime and wake time. If you don’t have a sleep schedule for your weekdays, create one and stick to it. 

You might feel as though sleeping in on weekends is a good way to catch up on sleep missed during the week. 

However, people who keep a regular bedtime and alarm clock routine across a seven-day period are more refreshed throughout the whole week than people who eschew the routine on weekends, by being free from social jetlag

Block Out Distractions 

Turn off all your devices at least an hour before bed, and keep away from your phone. Place it on ‘do-not-disturb’ if you have the option, and keep it out of your reach until morning. Across the room, if necessary.  

Resist the urge to check devices at night!

To avoid being disturbed by light sources, make sure any electronic devices that emit light while charging are charged during the day. Get a blackout blind for your window if needed, or wear an eye-mask. 

If noises inside or outside of your room are disturbing you and can’t be dealt with directly, consider wearing ear plugs or noise cancelling headphones.  

Some might recommend putting on a dry podcast, nature sounds, or a music app on a sleep timer before bed. 

However, these will fill your mind with thoughts and ideas when it should be empty. Keep your room silent. Make a conscious effort to clear your mind at night. If you must, think in images, like counting sheep. 

Many things bothering us in our day to day lives can only be dealt with during work hours. You put unnecessary stress on yourself by thinking about these things at night, and increase the likelihood of starting the day tired. 

Read Now: Why Understanding Sleep is Crucial to Your Wellbeing 

To Sum Up… 

The good news is that getting enough sleep, for most people, is a matter of routine and psychology.  

Build routine into your life, pay attention to what you put into your body, and train yourself to clear your mind at night. This way, you should finally get some sleep.  

As a final note, while these techniques are proven to be effective in a lot of cases, they aren’t guaranteed to work for everyone.  

If, after following this advice for 4 weeks, you feel you still aren’t getting enough sleep, see your GP. They will have insight, advice, and treatment personally tailored for your situation. 

Improving your sleep pattern can improve all aspects of your life, but if you need just that extra nudge in the right direction, contact us at Ceed. 

How to Stop Being Obsessive Over Things

Our minds are an enigma. Without them, we wouldn’t be able to learn new things, solve problems, or even feel emotions. We’d never feel happy, sad, angry, surprised, scared, or disgusted by an event that has just taken place before us. 

Emotions are a powerful thing, and they influence our actions and reactions. A common response to an unexpected circumstance is to begin obsessing over it, as we might feel out of control. Different people can obsess over different things depending on the individual, such as: 

  • Something work-related – perhaps we made an error and want to improve ourselves 
  • Someone in our life – a friend, family member or even a celebrity 
  • Hobbies and interests – collecting certain items, travelling, watching certain films or TV programmes

The key here is that we know we’re being obsessive, whether we know this ourselves or have been told so by someone else. An obsession can be addictive and difficult to overcome. Here are five ways for you to try and stop obsessing over things. 

1) Work Out What You’re Obsessing Over 

Any given obsession has a reason behind it, even an obsession as simple as something cultural like a book series. The key to figuring out why you’re obsessed in the first place is to determine the root of it and why you feel inclined to ruminate over it. 

It’s likely that there’s one aspect of your obsession you’re holding onto the most. This is likely what triggered the obsession in the first place. When it comes to a series of books, a person may become obsessed with it because of certain plot threads, characters, or the overall quality of the writing. Finding the part of your obsession that holds the most interest is useful when trying to let go. 

Try to pinpoint what attracts you to obsessing over something!

2) Write Things Down 

This doesn’t just go for those who have difficulty expressing their feelings. This seemingly basic solution is more effective than you might imagine. By simply jotting down any thoughts you have relating to your obsession, it will clear your mind of them and shift your focus elsewhere. 

As you begin to write down those thoughts and feelings, you’ll find that things become clearer. One thing will lead to another, culminating in an understanding of how and why you’ve developed this obsession. This can bring a sense of fulfilment and leave you with an answer! 

3) Distract Yourself 

As we all know, obsessions can become rather intrusive. We might find ourselves thinking about whatever it is we’re obsessing over day-in and day-out, hour-by-hour. Whether it’s something we really like or is a problem that we need to solve, we can’t help but constantly think about it. An obsession can become a distraction from important matters like our careers and family life, so the distraction needs to have a distraction for it! 

There are various different ways you can distract yourself from your obsession. Physical exercise will make not just your body, but your mind to focus on something else entirely. Don’t try simple walking or running, but instead aim for things like a team sport or rock climbing. Different media forms can also serve as a distraction, so try watching films and TV programmes, listen to music, or even play video games.

4) Look For New Interests 

This may sound like an obvious, clichéd solution, but the truth is it can actually work! A new interest, whether it’s a skill, a type of media you like, or even a hobby can wake up your brain. This can move your perspective away from your obsession and help you out of the doldrum you’re stuck in. A change in routine can help as well. 

Picking up a new hobby can help distract you from an obsession!

You might even try an activity that is the polar opposite of your obsession. This will feel like a breath of fresh air and a step in a different direction. Remember – variety is the spice of life! 

5) Distance Yourself From the Obsession 

Undoubtedly, it can be difficult to get over an obsession if the source of it is within arm’s reach, making it impossible to concentrate on any other topic or subject. This is why you should place a physical distance between yourself and the source, which will eventually lead to the mental distance that you’re really after. 

Obviously, this will be difficult at first, but your obsession will gradually weaken and you’ll find yourself no longer interested in it anymore. If the obsession is something physical, such as a person or a book you’ve been reading, keep them out of your sight altogether. 

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These were just five ways to help you put an end to an obsession that you might have. If you want more advice on making lifestyle changes, contact us at Ceed today. 

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